Presentations

Major Projects students must conduct two presentations, one at the end of each semester, and Minor Projects students one presentation. The presentations are normally held during the exam period. Presentations will be assessed on a number of criteria as outlined in the presentation lecture. Remember to invite your client or workplace supervisor to your final presentation!

Attendance

Students are required to attend all of the presentations in the session of their presentation (all morning or all afternoon.).

Structure

Divide your presentation in 3 distinct sections:

  1. Introduction: outline what you are going to say and, in group presentations, who is going to say it. Description of the background and purpose or the project.
  2. Body: the main content
  3. Conclusion: wrap up and specify the future of the project

Content

A presentation should refer to all work done in projects. You should aim to pitch the presentation at the level of a computer literate person who is not intimate with your project, i.e. final year computing students. Use your Project Report as a basis of your content, up to and including Work Outstanding. Some indication of problems encountered, how you overcame them (if you did:-) and what you have learnt should be included.

For a group project, each member must give some part of the presentation. Two general outlines are:

  1. Divide the overall content into 2, 3 or 4 sections (depending on the number of members in your group) with each member presenting one section.
  2. Divide your content into stages of development, with each member presenting their contribution in each stage. This may mean each member will speak 2 or 3 times and demonstrates good (or bad:-) teamwork!
  3. You may prefer some other format.

Example Outlines

A: First semester of a Major Project:

Concentrate on the design of your project. Do not give a demonstration unless your prototype is well advanced. Even on continuing projects, at this stage, a demonstration would be mostly based on the previous project, so leave it out.

  1. Introduction:
    • introduce clients and members of the group
    • outline of talk - headings and which members of the group will deliver the section
    • Background to project:
      • some background of client and how the project will be used
      • if continuing from a previous project, specify the development status when you took over
      • outline the overall goals for your project.
  2. Explain the users of the system and how each one will interact with the system (what they put in and get out). A Context Diagram or Business Proces Diagram is excellent to help explain this.
  3. Outline data needs for your system. An Entity-Relationship Diagram or Domain Model is very useful here.
  4. Show any alternatives that you have investigated. A table is a good way of comparing, even including a web page or pamphlet information from a commercial product.
  5. Now your System Design. First the Menu Hierarchy and then some screen/report designs.
    A menu hierarchy is also very useful to display (highlight) where you have extended/altered a previous project.
  6. Some screen shots of a prototype.
  7. If you have developed a solution to some major problem, then go over that. Pseudocode, network diagram etc. will be useful here. (Show off what you are proud of)
  8. Conclusion:
    • Outline what problems you have faced
    • Plus what you have learnt from the project
    • Anticipated future of the project, that is what you intend doing in second semester
  9. Questions

B: Second Semester of a Major Project:

Less time will be spent background and more on a demonstration of your product. However, do not spend too much of your talk on the demonstration.

  1. Introduction:
    1. introduce clients and members of the group
    2. outline of talk - headings and which members of the group will deliver the section
    3. Background to project:
      • some background of client and how the project will be used
      • if continuing from a previous project, specify the development status when you took over
      • outline the overall goals for your project.
  2. Explain the users of the system and how each one will interact with the system (what they put in and get out). A Context Diagram is excellent to help explain this.
  3. A Menu Hierarchy may help visualise the system
  4. A demonstration. Most systems will be too large to show all of it, so select parts of it that provide a good overview. Groups can demonstrate teamwork, by a different member of the group operating the computer to the member who is doing the talking.
  5. Show off solutions that you are particularly proud of. It may be some programming (even javascript), network solution that incorporates information from a secondary source etc. Incorporate (Powerpoint?) slides to show this - pseudocode, network diagram etc.
  6. Conclusion:
    • Outline what problems you have faced
    • Plus what you have learnt from the project
    • Anticipated future of the project. That is, what is remaining to be completed, or what extra features can still be incorporated into your system (by yet another group:-).
  7. Questions

C: Minor Project:

Minor projects can differ in their content, but usually something like B above is what is required. If you have done some development then a demonstration is pretty much essential.

Demonstration

A demonstration of your project is only to be given in the final presentation. If a demonstration is to be given in a presentation, the software to be used must be owned by the University for it to be run on our machines. A backup method, such as transparencies of the demonstration, is highly recommended.

Length

Group presentations will last for a maximum of 20 minutes and individual presentations 15 minutes. This will be followed by approximately 5 minutes of questions. About 5 minutes will be allowed for change over between presentations.

The chairperson will normally give a warning two minutes before your presentation must cease. If you would prefer to alter the warning time or introduce the team yourselves discuss the changes with the chairperson.

Staffing


Dr Sabine Wilkens
Pharmacy & Applied Science

Mary Martin
Computer Science
& Computer Engineering
La Trobe University, Bendigo

Notices

Welcome to the subject!